Whether you realize it or not, you are always communicating.  Taking pictures of live events has helped me better tune into body language–both good and bad.

When floating about a networking session at MassChallenge, I am scanning the scene for active and lively discussion.  Thankfully, these people are easy to find: their hands contour an imaginary product, their eyes widen in response to another’s claim, and their posture asserts their presence at the event.  Good body language  invites others to join the conversation and will help you build more connections.

Poor body language is easy to spot as well.  I will often see someone’s eyes drift over another’s shoulders to some focal point beyond–breaking eye contact and signaling that he or she is ready to move on.  Others will fold their arms and create a barrier between themselves and the people around them.  Poor body language will restrict your access into great conversations and make it hard for others to approach you.

My role has emphasized the importance of using good body language.  More than making the most of an event, the pictures that capture active and lively discussion are the pictures we select to present in our media.